Thirteen-year-old sensation Mo’ne Davis, who plays for Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, has become the first Little Leaguer to grace the national cover of Sports Illustrated. The 5-foot-4 inch, 111-pound eighth grader is not only taking the Little League World Series by storm, but also she has captured the nation’s attention. 
SI STAFF: More information on Mo’ne Davis cover GALLERY: View all of SI’s 2014 Covers
 

Thirteen-year-old sensation Mo’ne Davis, who plays for Philadelphia’s Taney Dragons, has become the first Little Leaguer to grace the national cover of Sports Illustrated. The 5-foot-4 inch, 111-pound eighth grader is not only taking the Little League World Series by storm, but also she has captured the nation’s attention. 

SI STAFF: More information on Mo’ne Davis cover 
GALLERY: View all of SI’s 2014 Covers

 

Kirk Gibson is best remembered for belting one of the greatest home runs in World Series history, a pinch-hit, two-run blast with two out in the bottom of the ninth inning that gave the Dodgers a 5-4 victory over Oakland in Game 1. As a manager, the 1988 NL MVP has shown great potential, taking the Arizona Diamondbacks to the postseason in 2011 and leading the team to .500 records in both 2012 and 2013.  On Saturday at 4 AM, his D-backs will open their season against the Dodgers at the Sydney Cricket Ground in Australia, nearly 7,800 miles from Chase Field in Phoenix. (Rusty Kennedy/AP; Kevin French/Icon SMI)
GALLERY: When MLB Players Were Managers

Kirk Gibson is best remembered for belting one of the greatest home runs in World Series history, a pinch-hit, two-run blast with two out in the bottom of the ninth inning that gave the Dodgers a 5-4 victory over Oakland in Game 1. As a manager, the 1988 NL MVP has shown great potential, taking the Arizona Diamondbacks to the postseason in 2011 and leading the team to .500 records in both 2012 and 2013.  On Saturday at 4 AM, his D-backs will open their season against the Dodgers at the Sydney Cricket Ground in Australia, nearly 7,800 miles from Chase Field in Phoenix. (Rusty Kennedy/AP; Kevin French/Icon SMI)

GALLERY: When MLB Players Were Managers

Tommy John shows the scar from his namesake surgery while manager of the Bridgeport Bluefins in May 2007.  John underwent the first ligament-replacement surgery in 1974 as a 31-year-old lefty pitcher with the Dodgers. John had won 124 games in his 12-year career until that point and he returned in 1976 and pitched 14 more seasons, winning 164 more games while making three All-Star teams and finishing as the Cy Young runner-up twice.  Dr. Frank Jobe, the first to perform the Tommy John surgery that would save the careers of countless major league pitchers, died yesterday. He was 88.  (Michael J. LeBrecht II/SI)
GALLERY: Top Pitchers After Tommy John Surgery

Tommy John shows the scar from his namesake surgery while manager of the Bridgeport Bluefins in May 2007.  John underwent the first ligament-replacement surgery in 1974 as a 31-year-old lefty pitcher with the Dodgers. John had won 124 games in his 12-year career until that point and he returned in 1976 and pitched 14 more seasons, winning 164 more games while making three All-Star teams and finishing as the Cy Young runner-up twice.  Dr. Frank Jobe, the first to perform the Tommy John surgery that would save the careers of countless major league pitchers, died yesterday. He was 88.  (Michael J. LeBrecht II/SI)

GALLERY: Top Pitchers After Tommy John Surgery

Born 140 years ago today, Honus Wagner was a member of the first class at Cooperstown and winner of eight NL batting titles, but his accomplishments with the Pirates in the early 20th century have been overshadowed somewhat by his famous baseball card. The T206 card, which Wagner demanded be discontinued after not wanting to be associated with the tobacco company that made it, sold for $2.8 million in 2007. (Chris Hondros/Newsmakers via Getty Images)
GALLERY: Baseball’s Milestone Contracts

Born 140 years ago today, Honus Wagner was a member of the first class at Cooperstown and winner of eight NL batting titles, but his accomplishments with the Pirates in the early 20th century have been overshadowed somewhat by his famous baseball card. The T206 card, which Wagner demanded be discontinued after not wanting to be associated with the tobacco company that made it, sold for $2.8 million in 2007. (Chris Hondros/Newsmakers via Getty Images)

GALLERY: Baseball’s Milestone Contracts

In the first season at new Yankee Stadium, Derek Jeter broke Lou Gehrig’s 72-year-old record for the most hits in Yankees history with hit number 2,722, a ground-ball through the left side off Orioles rookie Chris Tillman leading off the third inning on Sept. 11, 2009. The Yankees captain, who has been their starting shortstop since 1996 and led them to five World Series titles, announced on Facebook Wednesday that he will retire after the 2014 season. (Anthony J. Causi/Icon SMI)
GALLERY: Derek Jeter’s Greatest Hits

In the first season at new Yankee Stadium, Derek Jeter broke Lou Gehrig’s 72-year-old record for the most hits in Yankees history with hit number 2,722, a ground-ball through the left side off Orioles rookie Chris Tillman leading off the third inning on Sept. 11, 2009. The Yankees captain, who has been their starting shortstop since 1996 and led them to five World Series titles, announced on Facebook Wednesday that he will retire after the 2014 season. (Anthony J. Causi/Icon SMI)

GALLERY: Derek Jeter’s Greatest Hits

On Feb. 7 1994, four months after shocking the sports world by retiring from basketball on the heels of three consecutive NBA Championships, Michael Jordan took it even further by signing a minor league contract with the Chicago White Sox.  After 18 months and a .202 career batting average, Jordan retired from baseball and returned to the Chicago Bulls, where he won three more championships. (John Iacono/SI)
GALLERY: Michael Jordan: Ballplayer

On Feb. 7 1994, four months after shocking the sports world by retiring from basketball on the heels of three consecutive NBA Championships, Michael Jordan took it even further by signing a minor league contract with the Chicago White Sox.  After 18 months and a .202 career batting average, Jordan retired from baseball and returned to the Chicago Bulls, where he won three more championships. (John Iacono/SI)

GALLERY: Michael Jordan: Ballplayer