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Your link to sports history, one photo at a time. Curated by Andy Gray and Dave Kaye.

On Oct. 8, 1973, the Mets were routing the Reds 9-2 in Game 3 of the NLCS when Pete Rose slid hard into Mets shortstop Bud Harrelson at second base to try to break up a double play. Rose was upset about comments Harrelson had made in the press and shoved Harrelson, who swung his elbow. Fists started flying as both benches emptied. (John Iacono/SI)

GALLERY: Notorious Basebrawls

On Oct. 8, 1973, the Mets were routing the Reds 9-2 in Game 3 of the NLCS when Pete Rose slid hard into Mets shortstop Bud Harrelson at second base to try to break up a double play. Rose was upset about comments Harrelson had made in the press and shoved Harrelson, who swung his elbow. Fists started flying as both benches emptied. (John Iacono/SI)
GALLERY: Notorious Basebrawls

In a play that came to epitomize the play-to-win attitude of All-Star Games past, Pete Rose scored the winning run in the bottom of the 12th by barreling into catcher Ray Fosse at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati on July 14, 1970. (Herb Scharfman/Sports Imagery/Getty Images)

GALLERY: MLB All-Star Game Memorable Moments

In a play that came to epitomize the play-to-win attitude of All-Star Games past, Pete Rose scored the winning run in the bottom of the 12th by barreling into catcher Ray Fosse at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati on July 14, 1970. (Herb Scharfman/Sports Imagery/Getty Images)
GALLERY: MLB All-Star Game Memorable Moments

Homer Bailey pitched his second no-hitter in 10 months on July 2, 2013, becoming the first player in baseball to throw MLB’s two most recent no-no’s since Nolan Ryan in 1974-75. (Al Behrman/AP)

GALLERY: Most Recent No Hitters, By Team

Homer Bailey pitched his second no-hitter in 10 months on July 2, 2013, becoming the first player in baseball to throw MLB’s two most recent no-no’s since Nolan Ryan in 1974-75. (Al Behrman/AP)
GALLERY: Most Recent No Hitters, By Team

Legendary SI photographer Walter Iooss Jr. captures Johnny Bench during spring training in 1981. (Walter Iooss Jr./SI)

Legendary SI photographer Walter Iooss Jr. captures Johnny Bench during spring training in 1981. (Walter Iooss Jr./SI)

On this day in 1963, Pete Rose made his Major League debut. Rose, a switch hitter, is the all-time Major League leader in hits (4,256), games played (3,562), at-bats (14,053) and outs (10,328). (Heinz Kluetmeier/SI)

GALLERY: Classic Photos of Pete Rose

On this day in 1963, Pete Rose made his Major League debut. Rose, a switch hitter, is the all-time Major League leader in hits (4,256), games played (3,562), at-bats (14,053) and outs (10,328). (Heinz Kluetmeier/SI)
GALLERY: Classic Photos of Pete Rose

From 1970 to 1976, Cincinnati’s “Big Red Machine” averaged 98 wins per season and won four pennants and two World Series titles (1975 and 1976). The 1976 team featured the “Great Eight” starting position players of Johnny Bench, Pete Rose, Joe Morgan, Tony Perez, Dave Concepcion, George Foster, Ken Griffey and Cesar Geronimo. Some consider that lineup to be the best lineup ever. When the “Great Eight” started together, the team had a .784 winning percentage.

From 1970 to 1976, Cincinnati’s “Big Red Machine” averaged 98 wins per season and won four pennants and two World Series titles (1975 and 1976). The 1976 team featured the “Great Eight” starting position players of Johnny Bench, Pete Rose, Joe Morgan, Tony Perez, Dave Concepcion, George Foster, Ken Griffey and Cesar Geronimo. Some consider that lineup to be the best lineup ever. When the “Great Eight” started together, the team had a .784 winning percentage.

On this day in 2000, Ken Griffey Jr. became a member of the Cincinnati Reds when the Mariners traded the second-generation outfielder for pitcher Brett Tomko, outfielder Mike Cameron and two minor leaguers. Griffey would spend nine seasons with the Reds, slugging 210 home runs and driving in 602 runs. (Mark Lyons/Getty Images)

GALLERY: Ken Griffey Jr. Through The Years
SI VAULT: How the Reds got Junior (2.21.00)

On this day in 2000, Ken Griffey Jr. became a member of the Cincinnati Reds when the Mariners traded the second-generation outfielder for pitcher Brett Tomko, outfielder Mike Cameron and two minor leaguers. Griffey would spend nine seasons with the Reds, slugging 210 home runs and driving in 602 runs. (Mark Lyons/Getty Images)
GALLERY: Ken Griffey Jr. Through The YearsSI VAULT: How the Reds got Junior (2.21.00)

Barry Larkin and Ron Gant have a tug-of-war in the Reds locker room before a 1995 game between the Reds and Cardinals. Larkin was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on Monday. (David Walberg/SI)

CORCORAN: Fate of five borderline HOF candidates will be determined
VERDUCCI: One no-doubter and a lot of tough choices for Hall of Fame
LEMIRE: Barry Larkin is prepping for a likely Hall of Fame call
VOTE: Make your picks for the 2012 Hall of Fame class

Barry Larkin and Ron Gant have a tug-of-war in the Reds locker room before a 1995 game between the Reds and Cardinals. Larkin was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on Monday. (David Walberg/SI)
CORCORAN: Fate of five borderline HOF candidates will be determinedVERDUCCI: One no-doubter and a lot of tough choices for Hall of FameLEMIRE: Barry Larkin is prepping for a likely Hall of Fame callVOTE: Make your picks for the 2012 Hall of Fame class